Seaview Escape House / Coates Design: Architecture + Interiors | Seattle Architects



Seaview Escape House / Coates Design: Architecture + Interiors | Seattle Architects

© Lara Swimmer© Lara Swimmer© Lara Swimmer© Lara Swimmer+ 31


  • Area Area of ​​this architecture project Area:
    2800 sq. Ft.

  • Year Year of completion of this architecture project

    Year:


    2015


  • Photographs Photographs: Swimmer Lara

  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Owens Corning, Tremco, Bocci, Firestone Construction Products, Loewen, Lumascape, Lzf, Majestic, Taylor Metal Products, Crystalite, From Majo, Etera, Hinkley, WAC lighting

© Lara Swimmer
© Lara Swimmer

Text description provided by the architects. This waterfront home is a 2,800 square foot Pacific Northwest style 2 bedroom home anchored in a steeply sloping site. There is an open concept living room, dining room and kitchen that opens directly to the outside with a corner folding door system. A mass stone wall divides the public and private spaces of the house while enclosing the stairs, support areas and the powder room. There are many nature-inspired elements in this home, such as the pendant lights in the kitchen reminiscent of shells and wood-grain tiles in the master bathroom.

© Lara Swimmer
© Lara Swimmer
Sitemap
Sitemap
© Lara Swimmer
© Lara Swimmer

The hillside waterfront property has been in guest family since the 1950s and contains two plots that once housed a mid-century house and a 1920s cabin. The two siblings who acquired them wanted both houses be redeveloped jointly. They hoped to be able to use the houses, which are only 15 meters apart, for large family gatherings to make sure their families stay close.

© Lara Swimmer
© Lara Swimmer
© Lara Swimmer
© Lara Swimmer
Floor plans
Floor plans
© Lara Swimmer
© Lara Swimmer
© Lara Swimmer
© Lara Swimmer

The topography of the existing site was maintained to minimize ground disturbance on the steep slope and new homes were built over the existing footprint. Each home includes a material palette of stone, concrete, wood and metal, complementing each other while defining the subtle differences in the personal tastes of the siblings. Both use a mass stone wall to demarcate the private spaces from the central shared public spaces. The site is accessible via a common driveway shared between the two houses, offering a unique view of the green cantilever roof.

© Lara Swimmer
© Lara Swimmer





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